Taurus: A Hot Car By Any Other Name

September 13th, 2009 by admin Leave a reply »

Ford CEO Alan Mulally made an executive decision over a year ago to resurrect the Taurus brand. While that might not be a mistake per se, what was a mistake was attaching that brand to a very stylish high-performance car that sells for up to $47,000.

The Taurus was a fairly strong brand over 20 years ago, as the then-stylish car won many design awards and for a time was the largest-selling car in America. However, for many years following its late 1980s heyday, the Taurus brand was attached to a series of uninspired models that, despite frequent deep discounts, sold so poorly that the brand was eventually unceremoniously retired.

Thus, while there is certainly some equity in the Taurus name, I suspect it has as much negative equity as positive equity. While I find the new design quite attractive, I would be much more interested in it if it had a new name that was as impressive as the vehicle itself.

Moreover, this seems to be a major opportunity lost for Ford. At a time when Ford, like its domestic competitors, is desperately trying to convince consumers that it has learned from its error-prone past and is now making better cars than ever before, why look backward and associate yourself with an era when your reputation was at or near an all-time low?

Under Mr. Mulally’s leadership, Ford has been by far the most successful of the Big Three U.S. car manufacturers from a financial standpoint, and was the only one of the three to avoid a government bailout. But Mr. Mulally’s financial instincts appear to be much greater than his marketing instincts. Thus, while the attractive new Taurus may experience some degree of success, I have to believe that it would achieve considerably greater success with an attractive new name.

In other words, when Mr. Mulally mandated that the Taurus name be brought back from the dead, someone at Ford should have had a better idea.

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